Inside Nettlebed Cave: Crystals in a pool (PHOTOS)

Crystal formations in a pool, Photo credit: WHiO Photography

Nettlebed Cave, on Mt Arthur in Kahurangi National Park, is New Zealand’s deepest cave at 889 metres.

Hundreds of metres below the ground, far beyond where natural light has ever penetrated, a group of Kiwi cavers have discovered something small, but significant – a connection between two massive cave systems in the Arthur Mountain range of the South Island of New Zealand.

Nettlebed Cave is a limestone cave located in the Mount Arthur region of the northwest South Island of New Zealand.  Nettlebed Cave was thought to be the deepest cave system in the southern hemisphere. It drops 889 metres below its upper entrance (Blizzard Pot) to its lower exit (the Pearse River resurgence), and its 24 kilometres of cave passages make it New Zealand’s third longest passages.


A trip through the cave usually takes two days, and a chamber known as Salvation Hall serves as the sleepover spot. Large systems like Nettlebed took many expeditions and years to explore.

Photos: 

Crystal formations in a pool, Photo credit: WHiO Photography
Crystal formations in a pool, Photo credit: WHiO Photography
Photo credit: Nicolas C. Barth.
Photo credit: Josep Herrerías & Núria Zendrera

Photo credit:  Neil Silverwood/Barcroft India
Photo credit:  Neil Silverwood/Barcroft India

See also:
The Only Diamond Mine In the World Where You Can Be the Miner
Cave of Crystals “Giant Crystal Cave” at Naica, Mexico
Spectacular Neon Blue Lava Pours From Indonesia’s Kawah Ijen Volcano At Night (PHOTOS)
Enormous crystal Geode discovered in Spain
Top Spots For Gem Hunting In The US


Geology IN

This entry was posted in Geology and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply